We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded country. Always was, always will be, Aboriginal land.

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

The 2027 Care log aids to thoughtfully document our relationship and thinking around care moving towards 2029.

How do we transition to a society that cares deeply and intricately about the world and communities we inhabit? In 2027 the Care Strike began this transition. Drawing on Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, the log examines how we can interrogate the ways we care for others, communities, objects and places. Acknowledging the long history of BIPOC, Disabled and LGBTQI+ communities creating and maintaining care spaces as well as designing tools for giving and receiving care that are widely borrowed and used without credit today.

Drawing on the form of the NSW RMS Learner Driver log book, the log asks us to document the many ways we might care for others, communities, objects and our own world; recognising that they all require different forms of care. The log looks at trying to interrogate the way we give care by being critical of the ways it might be given. Acknowledging that at the same time care has had a violent past that has continued right up until the present especially for First Nations and Black communities. It will be an imperfect transition, but it’s a start.

Size: 250 x 290 x 15mm
Materials: Paper and plastic spiral
Edition of 1

Image Description
A spiral-bound book sits on it’s end with its pages fanned out. The pages are in different segments and each segment is a different size and colour. The words ‘observations of care’ are on a small pink section at the front; the word ‘self’ on a taller, wider section behind on purple paper. A blue paper segment with the words ‘person to person’ protrudes from above the purple paper. Two orange sections that sit one on top of the other are the widest of all coloured segments and have the words ‘community’ and ‘mutual aid’ written on them. Folded out at the back is a map in black and white. Small green pieces of paper that lift out of the book have a series of questions written in them that prompt the carer to think about the way and why they are practising care, for example “2. How can you exercise self-compassion through caring for yourself?”. The spiral binding all the sections together is a clear plastic.

2027 Care Log,
published by Marrickville Local Area Caregiving Collective

Ella Cutler

Inspired by

The Universal Caregiver Society

By Anne Manne

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

The 2027 Care log aids to thoughtfully document our relationship and thinking around care moving towards 2029.

How do we transition to a society that cares deeply and intricately about the world and communities we inhabit? In 2027 the Care Strike began this transition. Drawing on Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, the log examines how we can interrogate the ways we care for others, communities, objects and places. Acknowledging the long history of BIPOC, Disabled and LGBTQI+ communities creating and maintaining care spaces as well as designing tools for giving and receiving care that are widely borrowed and used without credit today.

Drawing on the form of the NSW RMS Learner Driver log book, the log asks us to document the many ways we might care for others, communities, objects and our own world; recognising that they all require different forms of care. The log looks at trying to interrogate the way we give care by being critical of the ways it might be given. Acknowledging that at the same time care has had a violent past that has continued right up until the present especially for First Nations and Black communities. It will be an imperfect transition, but it’s a start.

Size: 250 x 290 x 15mm
Materials: Paper and plastic spiral
Edition of 1

Image Description
A spiral-bound book sits on it’s end with its pages fanned out. The pages are in different segments and each segment is a different size and colour. The words ‘observations of care’ are on a small pink section at the front; the word ‘self’ on a taller, wider section behind on purple paper. A blue paper segment with the words ‘person to person’ protrudes from above the purple paper. Two orange sections that sit one on top of the other are the widest of all coloured segments and have the words ‘community’ and ‘mutual aid’ written on them. Folded out at the back is a map in black and white. Small green pieces of paper that lift out of the book have a series of questions written in them that prompt the carer to think about the way and why they are practising care, for example “2. How can you exercise self-compassion through caring for yourself?”. The spiral binding all the sections together is a clear plastic.